Making a Difference in Student Achievement Using the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts: What School and District Leaders Need to Know

 

Cheryl Liebling and Julie Meltzer, PCG Education

Forty-five states, several US territories, and the District of Columbia have adopted the new Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CCSS-ELA). The standards are widely touted as providing a clear, rigorous pathway that will prepare students to be college and career ready. States, districts, and schools are poised to align curriculum, instruction, and assessment. CCSS-ELA are complex, with implications for instruction and assessment in not only English language arts, but also history/social studies, science, and technical subjects.

Many school and district leaders are comparing their state standards to CCSS-ELA to identify commonalities and gaps—as well as to understand how CCSS-ELA impacts curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This PCG Education White Paper provides a quick overview of CCSS-ELA, describes eight differences between these standards and earlier standards documents, and outlines actions that school and district leaders will need to take to ensure that the potential of the new standards is unlocked for K–12 students.

Introduction

In June 2010, the Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI)  released the final version of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (CCSS-ELA).  The intent of CCSS-ELA is to provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn in the English language arts, so that teachers and parents know what they need to do to help students gain the knowledge and skills they will need for success in college and careers. 

 To Read More Please use the link below to download the full white paper. 

Common_Core_white_paper .pdf (1.09 mb)

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