The Federal Administration makes ACA-Related announcements

As the Senate continues to craft a repeal package for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the administration is taking more limited steps to influence implementation of the law, including three announcements this week: Federally-Facilitated SHOP Enrollment. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced on Monday, May 15, that it will be proposing a rule to have enrollment into Federally-facilitated Small Business Marketplace (known as Small Business Health Options Program or “SHOP”) health insurance plans go directly through insurers as of 2018. [More]

PCG creates summary of the House-passed health care bill

The American Health Care Act (“the bill”) passed the House of Representatives on May 4, 2017. As outlined in greater detail in the PCG summary, the bill does not repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in full, but rather proposes changes primarily focused on the ACA’s insurance affordability, Medicaid expansion, coverage requirements and revenue provisions. It also proposes changes to Medicaid funding more generally and allows states to waive medical underwriting prohibitions. [More]

States continue to pursue Section 1332 State Innovation Waivers

With repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) stalled, states are increasingly considering Section 1332 Waivers as a way to expand upon or customize the ACA to best address the unique circumstances within the state. Alaska and Oklahoma are the two most recent states to take formal steps toward State Innovation Waivers, both states following on the heels of the recent Section 1332 Waiver approval granted to Hawaii, which we summarized in the February edition of Health Policy News. [More]

HHS encourages Governors to consider state innovation waivers

On March 13, 2017, the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) released a letter to all governors outlining the parameters under which states can obtain waivers under section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). HHS notes that state innovation waivers to implement high-risk pools and state-operated reinsurance programs may be an important opportunity to lower health insurance premiums for consumers, to improve health insurance market stability in the state, and to increase consumer choice. [More]

Amended ACA repeal legislation headed for critical vote in the U.S. House of Representatives

On March 20, 2017, the leadership in the U.S. House of Representatives released amendments to the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA), which would repeal many provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The new amendments to AHCA would allow states to impose work-related activity requirements on specified categories of adult Medicaid recipients as a condition of eligibility. The work-related activity requirements would not apply to the aged, disabled, pregnant women, and certain other Medicaid eligibility groups; and would incorporate broad definitions of work-related activities and exemptions aligned with longstanding TANF requirements. An enhanced Medicaid administrative matching rate (a five percentage point increase on top of the usual 50 percent rate) would be available for Medicaid administrative expenditures necessary to implement the work-related activity requirements. [More]

House Committees move forward on ACA repeal

The House took a major step in advancing action on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) with the filing of the American Health Care Act. The bill, which was filed in the House of Representatives on March 6, 2017, is a compilation of budget reconciliation packages from the House Ways & Means Committee and the House Energy & Commerce Committee, in follow-up to the budget resolution adopted in January. [More]

Transitional health plans to continue through 2018

In November of 2013, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) introduced the concept of “grandmothered plans,” coverage in place prior to 2014 that would have been prohibited as of 2014 as a result of changes under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). CMS issued guidance permitting those plans to be renewed for existing policyholders if permitted by states. Specifically, such plans are not considered to be out of compliance with ACA provisions related to... [More]

Proposed ACA repeal legislation would increase persons without health coverage

On March 13, 2017, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released estimates on the impact of the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA). The CBO indicates that AHCA would increase the number of persons without health coverage by 24 million persons in 2026: 52 million persons without coverage in 2026, as compared to 28 million persons in 2026 under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). [More]

Proposed ACA repeal legislation would impose new restrictions on state Medicaid programs

On March 6, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives released its initial draft legislation to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The initial draft legislation would impose significant new restrictions on state Medicaid programs. The legislation would impose annual per capita caps on federal financial participation (FFP) in state Medicaid expenditures beginning with the federal fiscal year (FFY) 2020 (October 1, 2019 – September 30, 2020). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) would impose separate per capita caps for six Medicaid eligibility categories: the aged, blind, disabled, children, Medicaid expansion adults, and non-expansion adults.
For FFY 2020, CMS would... [More]

CMS proposes rules to stabilize health insurance markets

On February 15, 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued draft proposed regulations intended to stabilize the individual and small group health insurance markets under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The proposed rules would shorten the open enrollment period for 2018, amend standards on special enrollment periods, increase pre-enrollment verification of eligibility on the HealthCare.gov website, allow health insurance issuers to apply consumers’ payments to past unpaid debts for coverage, increase allowable variations in the actuarial value (AV) calculations, offer more flexibility in substantiating provider network adequacy, and facilitate insurers’ compliance with essential community provider (ECP) standards. [More]