CHIP funding crisis remains unresolved

Congressional authorization of federal funds for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which Nine million children depend on, expired on September 30, 2017. States are now operating CHIP on carryover and redistribution payments from prior years. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) estimates that at least one state will exhaust such funding in November 2017 and most will by March 2018. [More]

CBO releases report on bipartisan ACA stabilization plan

On October 25, 2017, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report on the Bipartisan Health Care Stabilization Act of 2017, which is now under consideration within the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. The new legislation would offer additional flexibility under the state innovation waiver process, appropriate funding for cost-sharing reductions (CSRs), require some insurers to pay rebates on premiums for 2018, allow more individuals to purchase high-deductible plans, and require Federal support for outreach and enrollment activities. [More]

Recent Federal health policy developments

There were several significant health policy developments at the Federal level this month, including a Presidential Executive Order, the announcement that the administration will no longer fund Cost Sharing Reductions (CSRs) and the release of the bipartisan effort to stabilize health insurance markets known as the Alexander-Murray bill. In follow-up to our post on these developments earlier this month, below, we share further updates and details regarding these developments, and share our analysis of their potential impacts. [More]

Major Health Policy Developments coming out of the Federal Administration

While Congressional efforts to change or repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) continue to be stalled, the federal administration announced two significant health policy developments at the end of last week – an Executive Order aimed at promoting access to plans not subject to the full range of ACA protections as well as the decision to stop making cost-sharing reduction payments immediately. [More]

Congress takes steps to reauthorize CHIP

On October 4, 2017, the U.S. Senate Finance Committee approved a bill that would reauthorize federal funding through FFY 2022 for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), a program that currently serves over nine million low-income children. New funding authorization for CHIP expired on September 30, 2017. For now, states are operating CHIP on federal allotments left over from prior years. Those reserves vary widely from state to state. [More]

Senators introduce ACA repeal legislation

On September 13, 2017, U.S. Senators Lindsey Graham, Bill Cassidy, Dean Heller, and Ron Johnson introduced legislation to scrap many provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) while imposing funding caps on the traditional Medicaid program. The bill could become law under budget reconciliation rules that block a Senate filibuster. The bill could pass the Senate and House on a majority vote before September 30, 2017.

The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) says that it can’t comprehensively analyze the bill’s potentially adverse impact on health insurance premiums and coverage until next month. Congress will be acting this month based on a preliminary CBO analysis expected to show long-term federal budget savings. [More]

Governors outline market stabilization strategy

On August 30, 2017, a bipartisan coalition of Governors issued a letter to Congress on steps needed to restore stability and affordability in coverage to 22 million Americans served through individual health insurance markets under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Governors’ letter sets the stage for testimony before a US Senate committee on September 7, 2017, by Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, Montana Governor Steve Bullock, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam, Utah Governor Gary Herbert, and Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper. [More]

Update on the Senate’s efforts to Repeal parts of the ACA

After releasing the Better Care Reconciliation Act at the end of last week, leadership in the U.S. Senate announced this week that it will not be voting on the bill before the July 4th Congressional recess as planned. Instead efforts are underway to overhaul the bill, with a vote is expected sometime after the recess. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said that he intends to submit a new version of the bill to be scored by the Congressional Budget Office today. [More]

21st Century Cures Act

On December 7, 2016 Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act (the “Act”), which was signed into law on December 14, 2016. The Act is aimed at modernizing health care delivery, improving quality and targeted improvements in the area of cancer treatment, mental health care, opioid addiction, and other focused areas. One such modernization effort requires states to implement Electronic Visit Verification (EVV) systems for personal care services and home health care services providers by 2019 and 2023, respectively. These EVV systems will help ensure that beneficiaries receive the care that is being billed to Medicaid. Additionally, the Act allocates over $1 billion in grant funding over the next two years for states to combat the opioid epidemic. States began the application process for grant funds in early 2017, and efforts are now underway in a number of states to implement new programs and services focused on treatment and prevention. Below we highlight one way PCG has identified to leverage existing claims data to implement reforms. This Act is largely funded through the Prevention and Public Health fund established in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For more information on additional modernization and reform elements of the Act, please click here. [More]